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Fadia Antabli

Fadia Antabli

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Arabic; MENA Language Coordinator

Phone number: 847-467-6780
Office location: Crowe Hall 4-113, 1860 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208
fadia.antabli@northwestern.edu

Fadia Antabli is the Language Coordinator for the MENA Program, an Assistant Professor of Instruction, Arabic, and co-chair of the Executive Committee of the Chicago Arabic Teachers Council. A Searle Fellow for 2015-2016, she holds a Masters of Science in Adult Education from Indiana University in Bloomington and an MA in Educational Technology from the University of Huddersfield in England. Her thesis research was on “Teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language.” Before joining Northwestern, Fadia worked as an Arabic language Lecturer at Indiana University—Purdue University Indianapolis. A native of Jerusalem, she comes with extensive experience in adult education and information technology instruction at the American Embassy in Amman, Jordan. Her research interests include educational theories and communicative approaches to learning, instructional design, Arabic literature and Islamic civilization and culture. Her recent research explores best classroom practices: “A Constructivist Approach to Learning: Classroom Practices for the Arabic Language Class.”

Asma Ben Romdhane

Asma Ben Romdhane

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Arabic

Phone number: 847-467-6350
Office location: Crowe Hall 4-107, 1860 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208
asma.benromdhane@northwestern.edu

Asma Ben Romdhane is an Arabic Fulbright Teaching Assistant alumna. Her focus is on the teaching and learning of Arabic as a second/foreign language. Her dissertation is titled “Impact of Social Interaction on the Acquisition of Spoken Arabic: Short-Term Study Abroad Context”. Her research interests include language and program assessment, multimedia and SLA, study abroad and intercultural competence, and teaching methods in L2 classroom learning. In spring 2015, she received a Stanley Grant for International Research. In the same month, she received a university-wide Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award from the University of Iowa. Her mission is to engage more people in learning Arabic and help them develop Middle Eastern and North African cross-cultural awareness. 

Fatima Khan

Fatima Khan

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Arabic

Phone number: 847-467-1637
Office location: Crowe Hall 4-111, 1860 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208
fatima@northwestern.edu

Fatima Khan is a native of Chicago and completed her undergraduate studies in economics from Northwestern University, where she began her study of the Arabic language. After her BA, she worked as a consultant for Accenture until she decided to pursue further study of Arabic. She did her graduate studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor with a concentration in Teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. She teaches Beginning and Intermediate Arabic at Northwestern. Currently she is the coordinator for Intermediate Arabic. She has received the Hewlett Grant for curriculum development to design a course to teach Media Arabic as well as a coursebook to help students understand broadcast news. Fatima has been named to the Associated Student Government's Faculty Honor Roll several times for excellence in teaching.

Pouye Khoshkhoosani

Pouye Khoshkhoosani

Lecturer in Persian

Phone number: 847-491-2402
Office location: Crowe 4-121
seyede.khoshkhoosani@northwestern.edu

Pouye Khoshkhoosani is a PhD candidate (ABD) in the School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies at the University of Arizona. She has taught Persian at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels at the University of Arizona and at the Arabic, Persian, and Turkish Language Immersion Institute at the at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research examines the role of poetry in legitimizing Iran’s Safavid dynasty (1502-1736 C.E.), focusing on the image of the ruler. She also explores the role of Safavid ideology in shaping poetic discourses of time and examines issues of style and genre in 16th and 17th century poetry. She also writes short stories. She is interested in subjects of women, immigration and the clash of cultures within the Iranians communities in the diaspora.

Ragy Mikhaeel

Ragy Mikhaeel

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Arabic

Phone number: 847-467-0927
Office location: Crowe Hall 4-117, 1860 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208
r-mikhaeel@northwestern.edu

Ragy is a native of Cairo, Egypt. He taught Arabic at Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Hobart and William Smith College before coming to Northwestern. He is the author of Barron’s Learn Arabic: The Fast and Fun Way (as Ragy H. Ibrahim), which focused on the Egyptian spoken dialect, and has worked on several curriculum development projects, including the preparation of an Egyptian dialect version of Munther Younes's Living Arabic textbook. He is currently preparing teaching materials to assist Islamic history and Arabic literature students in reading Arabic-language manuscripts. From 1993–2002, Ragy worked as a journalist for Al-Ahram Weekly (Cairo), covering subjects from art, politics, the environment, popular science, and gender. He received the Council on Language Instruction (CLI) 2015 Excellence in Foreign Language Teaching Award.

Oya Topçuoğlu

Oya Topçuoğlu

Lecturer, Turkish

Phone number: 847-491-2402
Office location: Crowe 4-121
oya.topcuoglu@northwestern.edu

Oya Topçuoğlu received her PhD in Mesopotamian Art and Archaeology from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago in 2016. Her teaching experience covers a range of subjects including modern Turkish language and culture, and history and archaeology of the Middle East. She has taught Intermediate and Advanced level Turkish at the University of Chicago between 2011 and 2016, and she has been teaching Elementary and Intermediate Turkish classes at Northwestern since 2014. She also offers a seminar on the relationship of archaeology and politics in the modern Middle East. Oya is an archaeologist by training, who specializes in Mesopotamia and Anatolia. She has excavated extensively in Turkey. Her research addresses issues of social identity and cultural exchange, and the effects of political change and ideology on the material record of the ancient Middle East. In addition to her work on iconography and symbolism, Oya studies political uses of the ancient past and its role in the formation of national identities in the modern Middle East. She is particularly interested in these issues as well as the history of archaeology and museums, and cultural heritage preservation in her native Turkey.

Hanna Tzuker-Seltzer

Hanna Tzuker-Seltzer

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Hebrew (MENA and Jewish Studies)

Office location: Crowe 5-159
hanna.seltzer@northwestern.edu

Hanna Seltzer was born and raised in Jerusalem, where she studied Film and Television. Her short narrative film was aired on the prominent Israeli network Arutz Shtayim (“Channel 2”) and was awarded the channel’s Snunit Prize for emerging Israeli filmmakers. Prior to her PhD studies at the University of California, Berkeley, she graduated summa cum laude from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, earning her BA in Hebrew Literature with Designated Emphasis in Creative Writing. Hanna also holds a certificate in teaching Hebrew as a Second Language from the Rothberg International School at the Hebrew University, where she taught in the Summer Ulpan. She has also taught at the Milah Ulpan in Jerusalem.

During her doctoral studies at UC Berkeley (PhD, 2017, Jewish Studies), she taught courses in modern Hebrew language and Jewish Studies, earning UC Berkeley’s Outstanding Graduate Instructor Award. In addition to her focus on Hebrew Literature, Hanna also studied Yiddish and examined the complicated relationship between Hebrew and Yiddish in the texts of Yossel Birstein and other Yiddish writers. Her dissertation, “Retrospectivity as an Ethical Stance: Revisiting the Zionist Dream in Israeli Fiction and Film,” examines Israeli novels and films whose plots flashback to the period between the pre-state Yishuv in Palestine and the first years of Israeli statehood. Hanna explores how this retrospective gaze suggests a nuanced ethical critique that both depicts the experience of daily life in those heady ideological days and offers a historical reassessment of the values of that era.

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